Organon


Organon, 2008
wood, paint, metal legs with wheels, diverse materials and found objects, digital prints

Organon consists of a mobile sculpture floating in and through the gallery space. It includes a text presented on four posters and various abstract objects, arranged on six tables in different shapes that can be easily moved. The materials range from clay and wood to Plexiglas, a broken vase and fleece, arranged in constellations of which some are more clearly defined than others. The physical appearance of the sculpture will change several times during the exhibition, as it will be ‘performed’ by a person assigned by the artists to rearrange the tables and the objects. This will take place for the first time during the opening. In this sense Maire and Pisano create a distance to the work, as they hand over the arrangement to a third person, but furthermore the sculpture remains open ended and part of a continuous performative act that span over a longer period of time.

Also the text-part of the sculpture forms a crucial element in this undertaking. Entitled Organon and the audience perception, it reads as an abstract flow of thoughts that intervene with the physical appearance of the sculpture, and lingers between plain description (‘a piece of Plexiglas that reflects in a bizarre way’), description of an act (‘the objects are brought in the space, but they are brought in by movements, they are placed’) and abstract theorization as well as self reflection (‘in general we cannot say the opposite of what we say, I mean, for example in the construction of a sentence, but in the sculpture it is made possible by the cyclic repetition of the event’). The text includes reflections on time (past, present, future), repetition and the act of performing, and becomes an act in itself.

The work can be perceived as an attempt to dissolve the distinction between performance, text and sculpture by using and activating a set of abstract objects. It is a formal piece of work, operating in a formal language but it is a language without rules. [press release Croy Nielsen, 2008]


Organon, 2008
wood, paint, metal legs with wheels, diverse materials and found objects, digital prints


Organon, 2008
wood, paint, metal legs with wheels, diverse materials and found objects, digital prints


Organon, 2008
wood, paint, metal legs with wheels, diverse materials and found objects, digital prints

The Wave


The Wave, 2009
16 mm film, colour, 13:57 min

Falke Pisano and Benoît Maire begun collaborating in 2006. Concerned with the mechanics of film making The Wave, a 16 mm film, (colour, 13.57 min, 2009) can be seen as part of an ongoing conversation between the artists – that considers the space between sculpture and the language of film. The Wave is constructed in three parts – the movement of a ‘wave’ alluding to three distinct voices, moving into and across each other, producing gaps and inconsistencies that disrupt language in a very open narrative.

The first chapter constructs and investigates a relationship between an object and a gaze, between an ob- ject and a subject. An object is described as round, but with edges, it is smooth and abstract. What happens to this object in relation to a subject, what is it without the gaze of a subject? Can we imagine an object without the subject? What is an object if it is not for me?

In the following scene we are on a sandy beech, it is windy and the sea is rough, big waves repeatedly and rhythmically make their way toward the shore. A branch has been stuck in the sand, crossed by another, creating an improvised assemblage that marks out a situation, producing a ‘place’. Within this context there is a table and a chair. On the table are a number of objects; different glasses, casts of hands in a variety of colors, a clock. A man and a woman interact with these things, as one moves them around the other observes – gently alluding to the instability of meaning. The scene is silent although the protagonists speak, as there is no sound, nor subtitles.

There is a clear shift again as the viewer is transposed to a park – from ‘nature’ to ‘culture’. The camera finds a public sculpture, a big concrete shaped shelter. People are sitting inside it. Like the assemblage of branches on the beach this sculpture – frames, communicates, sets up a location that directs people to be- have in a certain way. [press release Hollybush Gardens, 2011]


The Wave, 2009
16 mm film, colour, 13:57 min


The Wave, 2009
16 mm film, colour, 13:57 min